For remanufacturing to gain more acceptance and be better understood by the public and by the official bodies that operate modern services, the industry needs to be heard at the highest political levels.

One political figure committed to furthering the cause of reman is Joseph D. Morelle, a member of the US House of Representatives since last November, representing the Rochester area in New York’s 25th district.

A supporter of measures to protect the environment and care for manufacturing/remanufacturing throughout his career, Congressman
Morelle is destined to be a voice for reman on Capitol Hill for years to come.

During the 2019 RIC-RIT World Remanufacturing Conference on October 9 and 10 in Rochester, he will present his views on remanufacturing and what can be done to strengthen its role and position in the eyes of the public.

A FIT WITH THE TIMES

“Yes, I want to do what I can for remanufacturing,” Morelle told Reman World. “It offers many benefits to society. I’m still new in Washington but I believe more can be done. Reman is a good match with the many issues of our time.”

Morelle may be a freshman on Capitol Hill, but he’s no newcomer to politics. He started early as a local councilman in his 20s. In 1990, he was elected to the New York State Assembly, where he rose to become Majority Leader for the Democrats. He made a name for himself as a progressive and dynamic proponent of healthcare and a creator of opportunities within manufacturing and remanufacturing.

When the legendary congresswoman, Louise Slaughter, passed away in 2018 after 30 years in congress, Morelle was chosen to succeed her, which he promptly did by gaining a 61 per cent victory against his republican opponent. Thus, the voters in New York’s 25th congressional district not only sent an admired local man and small business owner to represent them in the nation’s capital – they also voted for a friend of remanufacturing.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

His commitment is reflected in his record over almost four decades at different levels of government. In the New York State Legislature he authored more than 200 laws, including major reforms to the workers compensation system. He was behind requirements for carbon monoxide detectors in one- and two-family homes, tougher regulations governing charitable organizations, and protections for the elderly and infirm in nursing homes or benefiting from home based health care.

In January 2001, Morelle was appointed Chairman of the Standing Committee on Tourism, Arts, and Sports Development in New York State and worked closely with area leaders to develop Rochester as a center for tourism and the arts in Western New York. Other assignments included Economic Development, Job Creation, Commerce and Industry; Higher
Education; Local Governments; and Libraries and Education Technology, and he contributed to the creation of a Subcommittee on Manufacturing. One of his aims was to give the manufacturing sector a greater voice in state government.

Of more immediate interest to this year’s Rochester conference is perhaps how Morelle as a state representative and now as a 62 year-old US Congressman has helped promote the future economic success of remanufacturing on his home ground in Rochester, throughout his state, and nationally. Among the remanufacturing centers he has helped secure funding for throughout his state is the Rochester Institute of Technology.

The scene is set for a mutually rewarding session between those at the sharp end of remanufacturing and those who has it in their power to move the industry forward.

More on Rochester Conference in Reman World October 2019 issue